Prioridades en gestión e investigación sobre pesca marítima recreativa en el Sur de Europa

Bajo el título Research and management priorities for Atlantic marine recreational fisheries in Southern Europe, exponemos algunos resultados del I Taller sobre pesca recreativa en el litoral Atlántico Ibérico, que tuvo lugar en 2016. La publicación en Marine Policy es accesible de manera gratuita hasta el 3 de noviembre de 2017 pinchando en:

Servicios ecosistémicos culturales marinos: lagunas de conocimiento y prioridades de investigación

Acaba de ser publicado nuestro trabajo de revisión sobre servicios ecosistémicos culturales marinos en la revista One Ecosystem. El artículo es de acceso abierto y puede ser descargado libremente.

El resumen:

Cultural ecosystem services (CES) reflect peoples’ physical and cognitive interactions with nature and are increasingly recognised for providing non-material benefits to human societies. Whereas coasts, seas, and oceans sustain a great proportion of the human population, CES provided by these ecosystems have remained largely unexplored. Therefore, our aims were (1) to analyse the state of research on marine and coastal CES, (2) to identify knowledge gaps, and (3) to identify research priorities and pinpoint the move forward. To accomplish these objectives, we did a systematic review of the scientific literature and synthesised a subset of 72 peer-reviewed publications. Results show that research on marine and coastal CES is scarce compared to other ecosystem service categories. It is primarily focused on local and regional sociocultural or economic assessments of coastal ecosystems from Western Europe and North America. Such research bias narrows the understanding of social-ecological interactions to a western cultural setting, undermining the role of other worldviews in the understanding of a wide range of interactions between cultural practices and ecosystems worldwide. Additionally, we have identified clusters of co-occurring drivers of change affecting marine and coastal habitats and their CES. Our systematic review highlights knowledge gaps in: (1) the lack of integrated valuation assessments; (2) linking the contribution of CES benefits to human wellbeing; (3) assessing more subjective and intangible CES classes; (4) identifying the role of open-ocean and deep-sea areas in providing CES; and (5) understanding the role of non-natural capital in the co-production of marine and coastal CES. Research priorities should be aimed at filling these knowledge gaps. Overcoming such challenges can result in increased appreciation of marine and coastal CES, and more balanced decision-supporting mechanisms that will ultimately contribute to more sustainable interactions between humans and marine ecosystems.